Specific “Refactorings”

Refactorings are the opposite of fiddling endlessly with code; they are precise and finite. Martin Fowler’s definitive book on the subject describes 72 specific “refactorings” by name (e.g., “Extract Method,” which extracts a block of code from one method, and creates a new method for it). Each refactoring converts a section of code (a block, a method, a class) from one of 22 well-understood “smelly” states to a more optimal state. It takes awhile to learn to recognize refactoring opportunities, and to implement refactorings properly.

Refactoring to Patterns

Refactoring does not only occur at low code levels. In his recent book, Refactoring to Patterns, Joshua Kerievsky skillfully makes the case that refactoring is the technique we should use to introduce Gang of Four design patterns into our code. He argues that patterns are often over-used, and often introduced too early into systems. He follows Fowler’s original format of showing and naming specific “refactorings,” recipes for getting your code from point A to point B. Kerievsky’s refactorings are generally higher level than Fowler’s, and often use Fowler’s refactorings as building blocks. Kerievsky also introduces the concept of refactoring “toward” a pattern, describing how many design patterns have several different implementations, or depths of implementation. Sometimes you need more of a pattern than you do at other times, and this book shows you exactly how to get part of the way there, or all of the way there.

Source: https://www.versionone.com/agile-101/agile-software-programming-best-practices/refactoring/